Celebrating [email protected] History: The Chicano Movement and The Young Lords

Throughout the month of September, City Lights Bookstore is celebrating [email protected] History.  Today, we’re featuring books about important liberation movements in [email protected] history.

Youth, Identity, Power: The Chicano Movement
by Carlos Munoz
(Verso)

A unique exploration of the origins and development of Chicano radicalism in America.

Youth, Identity, Power is the classic study of the origins of the 1960s Chicano civil rights movement. Written by a leader of the Chicano student movement who also played a key role in the creation of the wider Chicano Movement, this is the first full-length work to appear on the subject. It fills an important gap in the history of political and social protest in the United States.

Carlos Muñoz places the Chicano Movement in the context of the political and intellectual development of people of Mexican descent in the USA, tracing the emergence of student activists and intellectuals in the 1930s and their initial challenge to the dominant white racial and class ideologies. He then documents the rise and fall of the Chicano Movement of the 1960s, situating it within the 1960s civil rights and radical movements and assessing the Chicano Movement’s contribution to the development of the Mexican American population and the Latino population as a whole.

In an afterword to this new edition, Muñoz charts the burgeoning growth of US Latino communities, assesses the nativist backlash against them, and argues that Latinos must play a central role in a new movement for multiracial democracy.

 

The Chicano Studies Reader: An Anthology of Aztlan
Edited by Chon A. Noriega, Eric Avila, Karen Mary Davalos, Chela Sandoval, and Rafael Pérez-Torres
(UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center Press)

The second edition of the Chicano Studies Reader brings this best-selling anthology up to date. Five additional essays address topics that have drawn increasing attention in the journal over the past decade, including cross-disciplinary studies, investigations of mass media and public culture, and explorations of the intersection of race, sexuality, and citizenship. These essays correspond to the themes that organize the original set of twenty-essays and introductions: Decolonizing the Territory, Performing Politics, Configuring Identities, and Remapping the World. The revised edition documents the foundation of Chicano studies, testifies to its broad disciplinary range, and explores its continuing development.

The Young Lords: A Reader
Darrel Enck-Wanzer, Iris Morales, Denise Oliver-Velez
(NYU Press)

The Young Lords, who originated as a Chicago street gang fighting gentrification and unfair evictions in Puerto Rican neighborhoods, burgeoned into a national political movement in the late 1960s and early 1970s, with headquarters in New York City and other centers in Philadelphia, Boston, Los Angeles, and elsewhere in the northeast and southern California. Part of the original Rainbow Coalition with the Black Panthers and Young Patriots, the politically radical Puerto Ricans who constituted the Young Lords instituted programs for political, social, and cultural change within the communities in which they operated.

The Young Lords offers readers the opportunity to learn about this vibrant organization through their own words and images, collecting an array of their essays, journalism, photographs, speeches, and pamphlets. Organized topically and thematically, this volume highlights the Young Lords’ diverse and inventive activism around issues such as education, health care, gentrification, police injustice and gender equality, as well as self-determination for Puerto Rico.

 

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